Types of writing

FINAL PORTFOLIO
Due: September 6th by 9pm
180 points
Description: Throughout our course, we have explored a variety of types of writing. From
writing in digital spaces to writing in professional and academic environments, we have
discovered how written communication can take many forms. However, regardless of these
different contexts, we have focused on how the primary purpose of writing is to make meaning.
As noted in our syllabus:
Although we complete rigorous, academic writing shaped by the standards of our disciplines, we
also seek to recognize that writing is a highly context-specific undertaking. In other words, in
order to communicate successfully, we must be prepared to adapt our writing for different
purposes and audiences. Thus, the ultimate goal is for us to understand, and engage in, writing
as a way to make meaning.
Prompt: After reviewing your three core assessments (i.e., digital writing, cover letter/personal
statement, policy memo), write a reflection about how your perspective on writing has
evolved over the summer. This reflection should also take into account the unprecedented
moment we are living in.1 As you reflect, you will likely consider the following questions.
However, these are merely a framework and do not represent the universe of considerations. Nor
is it expected that you’ll be able to address each one within the limited word count:
• (1) Why is writing an important tool in my personal and professional lives?
• (2) What writing assessment(s) felt most challenging? Why?
• (3) What writing assessment(s) felt most accessible? Why?
• (4) Do I prefer to write in digital or “real world” spaces?
• (5) What are the different ways I have incorporated feedback into my writing?
• (6) Why is it worthwhile to revise my writing?
Suggested Steps:
(1) If necessary, review any lesson materials, readings, discussions, etc. relevant to revising your
essay drafts and/or writing your final commentary.
(2) Revise your three assessments based on your own critique, feedback from peers and us, and
the new skills, information, and/or perspective you’ve gained since writing each initial draft.
2 Be
sure to bold your revisions or use track changes so we can focus our assessment on your
improvement.
1For example, perhaps you want to comment on how the pandemic has impacted your anticipated job market, which
changed how you approached your cover letter. Or, perhaps the current social upheaval impacted the topic of your
policy memo. Or, on a more personal note, you’ve likely encountered a lot of writing on social media and other
digital spaces about COVID-19 and vaccines, racism, police brutality, politics, injustice, etc. You’re welcome to
weave any of this (and more) into your reflection on the importance of written communication.
2
It is not expected that you completely rewrite your assessment, or that you incorporate every piece of feedback you
receive. You have received multiple perspectives on your writing/arguments/opinions throughout the course in order
to challenge you to reflect upon the different ways your work/thoughts can be refined. Some of this feedback has
been on written, some has been audio, some has been during seminar, some has been on discussion boards, etc. The
key is to identify the most meaningful ways to improve your work within the limited time constraints of the quarter.
(3) Complete the final reflection.
(4) Compile your final project into one document, which includes your three revised assessments
and your reflection.3
Formatting: Your final reflection cannot exceed 750 words (and should be at least 600). Thus,
your entire project will be approximately 4000 words.
4 Cite all your sources; references are not
included in the word limit.
Policies: The project must be uploaded to Canvas by 9pm on September 6th
. Please submit your
final as one Word document, but make sure to distinguish between the four parts (i.e.,
assessment 1, assessment 2, assessment 3, and reflection).
Rubric: Please consult the attached rubric in order to understand how your final project will be
assessed. We take a holistic approach to assessing your work. For example, in terms of
assessments 1-3, we juxtapose your original drafts (i.e., those submitted to Canvas prior to peer
revisions) with the final version in order to determine improvement throughout the course.
However, we also recognize that you have only a short amount of time to revise certain
assessments (e.g., your policy memo). Thus, we do not expect each final draft to look radically
different from the first draft. Ultimately, the main purpose of this process is meant to ensure that
you are not measured against your peers, but rather, only against yourself. Regardless of how
many points you received initially for any assessment, you can still receive full points for these
parts of the final project rubric as long as you approach the revision process with sincerity and
sustained effort.
3Please only submit your final versions of assessments. No resubmission of drafts or reflections necessary.
4Approximately: 750 words for assessment one, 750 words for assessment two, 1500 words for assessment three,
750 words for reflection, 250 words extra wherever you may need it.
Excellent Above
Average Average Needs
Improvement Points
Assessment 1
(40 Points)
Student
comprehensively
integrates peer and
professor feedback in a
meaningful way. Student
shows substantive and
grammatical
improvement from first
draft.
Student
integrates peer
and professor
feedback.
Student shows
improvement
from first draft
in critical areas.
Student integrates
some peer and
professor feedback.
Student shows
improvement from
first draft but does
not exceed baseline
revisions.
Student does
not demonstrate
an ability to
integrate
feedback.
Assessment 2
(40 Points)
Student
comprehensively
integrates peer and
professor feedback in a
meaningful way. Student
shows substantive and
grammatical
improvement from first
draft.
Student
integrates peer
and professor
feedback.
Student shows
improvement
from first draft
in critical areas.
Student integrates
some peer and
professor feedback.
Student shows
improvement from
first draft but does
not exceed baseline
revisions.
Student does
not demonstrate
an ability to
integrate
feedback.
Assessment 3
(40 Points)
Student
comprehensively
integrates peer and
professor feedback in a
meaningful way. Student
shows substantive and
grammatical
improvement from first
draft.
Student
integrates peer
and professor
feedback.
Student shows
improvement
from first draft
in critical areas.
Student integrates
some peer and
professor feedback.
Student shows
improvement from
first draft but does
not exceed baseline
revisions.
Student does
not demonstrate
an ability to
integrate
feedback.
Reflection
(40 Points)
Student reflects critically
and meaningfully upon
the evolution of their
writing, as well as all
other relevant course
content. Student
provides compelling
insights and conclusions.
Student reflects
critically upon
the main ways
their writing has
changed, as
well as major
information and
issues relevant
to our writing
course.
Student reflects
upon some but not
all of the
information and
issues relevant to
our writing course.
Student’s
understanding of
the evolution of
their writing is
limited.
Student does
not demonstrate
a grasp of
information and
issues relevant
to our writing
course.
Primer
Organization
(10 Points)
Student presents
information in logical
and stylistically
advanced sequence.
Student
presents
information in
logical
sequence that
has only minor
lapses in style.
Student presents
information in
logical sequence
but there are gaps
that inhibit reader’s
understanding.
Student’s
presentation of
information is
difficult to
follow.
Primer
Formatting &
Timely
Submission
(10 Points)
Student adheres to
formatting guidelines
and includes relevant
images, hyperlinks,
references, etc.
Student adheres
to formatting
guidelines and
includes some
relevant
sources.
Student adheres to
formatting
guidelines but does
not exceed the
baseline
requirements.
Student fails to
adhere to
formatting
guidelines.