The 10 Strategic Points for the Prospectus, Proposal, and Dissertation

The 10 Strategic Points for the Prospectus, Proposal, and Dissertation

 Ten Strategic PointsComments or Feedback
Broad Topic AreaExploring the gender gap in STEM and the effects of gender sterotypes. 
Lit ReviewBackground of the problem/gap:A further study focusing on the lack of females in STEM (Brown, 2019) Women make up half of the college-educated workforce; in STEM, they only account for 29% of the workforce (Brown, 2019).Because of this underrepresentation, they have to deal with gender stereotypes, especially in STEM fields (Brown, 2019).Women currently only account for 21% of the higher paid executive positions in the technology field and 13% in the engineering filed (Botella et al, 2019) 42% of women in the EU sighted lack female role models in the STEM field, while 39% say they experienced bias in the workplace (Botella et al, 2019). There is a belief that is held by school-age kids that STEM takes natural brilliance a trait for whatever reason believed to held more often by males (Holmes,2019). Research points to a persistent gap in the number of males vs. females at a young age (Middle School) aspiring in STEM fields (Holmes,2019).It is suggested that since a high value is not placed on STEM tasks, females are less likely to be interested (Holmes,2019).Among many reasons’ women avoid computer science feelings of intimidation and lack of confidence (Khadija,2020)Theoretical foundations (models and theories to be the foundation for study);Social identity theory (Tajfel, 1978; Tajfel & Turner, 1979)     Review of literature topics with the key theme for each one;The damging consequences of gender sterotypes: Women only account for  20% of undergraduates in Computer science and engineering (Hewlett, Luce, & Servon, 2008).Low number women in stem work force: While Women make up half of the college-educated workforce; in STEM, they only account for 29% of the workforce (Brown, 2019).Reasons for low female to male ratio in some STEM fields: Fealings of intimidation and lack of confediance partly to blame for low female ratio (Khadija, 2020) Summary.Gap/problem: There is a need to identify reasons for the declining number of females in STEM fields and, in particular, computer science. Prior studies: Prior studies point to cultural stereotypes and unfriendly work environments.  A qualitative study to address the growing gaps in knowledge of the proposed problem. Fill in existing gaps in recent research with a quantitative methodology. 
Problem StatementIt is not known how female leaders in Science, Technology, and Mathmatics describe the influence of gender-based stereotypes in their leadership roles. 
Research QuestionsRO: How do females in Science, Technology, and Mathematics describe the influence of gender based stereotypes in their leadership roles? R1: How do females in Science, Technology, and Mathematics describe the influence of gender based  social categorisation in their leadership roles? R2:How do females in Science, Technology, and Mathematics describe the influence of gender based social identification in their leadership roles? R3:How do females in Science, Technology, and Mathematics describe the influence of gender based social comparison in their leadership roles?   
SampleLocation: San Antonio, TX United States of AmericaPopulation: 1,578,030 million 16.60% Bachelors Degree 9.28% graduate Degree50.6% population femaleSample:  15 random sample of females working in computer science. 15 random sample of females not working in IT. 
Describe Phenomena (qualitative) or Define Variables/Hypotheses (quantitative)Phenomenon: Understanding the psychology behind why computer science not only has a low number of females but a decline of females and how to turn that around.   
Methodology  & DesignThe methodology and design is a qualitative descriptive study. There will be descriptive statistics used to quantify and correlate the percentage of females in STEM. 
Purpose StatementThis qualitative descriptive study aims to develop an understanding of the psychological reasons women choose not to go into STEM.    
Data Collection ApproachSocial media surveys Participants in the field will be asked a list of survey questionsOne-on-one interviews will be conductedSemi-structured questions30-minute sessions per participantArchival DataGrand Canyon University library resources 
Data Analysis ApproachData will be organized and prepared for analysis.The problem will be observedPatterns identifiedGeneralization developedHype RESEARCH qualitative data analysis softwareData storage, management, and analysisTriangulationComparing results from interviews and journals with archival data to identify themes related to the research question.Phenomenological reduction and horizontalization (Lodico et al., 2010; Merriam, 2009)All aspects of data will be equally reviewed and synthesized. 
   

References

Wise psychological interventions to improve gender and racial equality in STEM

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Botella, C., Rueda, S., López-Iñesta, E., & Marzal, P. (2019). Gender Diversity in STEM Disciplines: A Multiple Factor Problem. Entropy, 21(1), 30. doi:10.3390/e21010030

Brown, Katherine N., “Implicit Stereotypes: An Explanation for the Lack of Female Leadership in the STEM Fields?” (2019). All Theses. 3065. https://tigerprints.clemson.edu/all_theses/3065

E. López-Iñesta, C. Botella, S. Rueda, A. Forte and P. Marzal, “Towards Breaking the Gender Gap in Science, Technology, Engineering and Mathematics,” in IEEE Revista Iberoamericana de Tecnologias del Aprendizaje, vol. 15, no. 3, pp. 233-241, Aug. 2020, doi: 10.1109/RITA.2020.3008114.

Gender Diversity in STEM Disciplines: A Multiple Factor Problem

by Carmen Botella,Silvia Rueda,OrcID,Emilia López-Iñesta andPaula Marzal

Entropy 2019, 21(1), 30; DOI: 10.3390/e21010030

Holmes, K., Gore, J., Smith, M., & Lloyd, A. (2018). An Integrated Analysis of School Students’ Aspirations for STEM Careers: Which Student and School Factors Are Most Predictive? International Journal of Science & Mathematics Education, 16(4), 655–675 DOI: 10.1007/s10763-016-9793-z

Judith M. Delaney, Paul J. Devereux,

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Khadija Jirari Stewart, Gloria Childress Townsend, and Sharmin Tunguz. (2020). “An Unexplored Relationship: Women in Computing and Athletics”. DOI: 10.1145/3328778.3366884