The menstrual app Flo

In this paper I would like to concentrate on the menstrual app Flo. In our times people like to become more independent about their health, from going all the time to the clinic/doctor. I would like to write about the app’s features, how it operates, and how it affects women of all ages. Cycle monitoring applications save and analyze data such as your previous periods, sleep patterns, heart rate, basal body temperature, and cervical fluid. You enter the information into the app, which uses it to predict when you’ll have your period, when you’ll ovulate or if you should be examined for disease. Women are becoming more aware of their bodies and health, so having an app that calculates everything for you rather than a self-guided calendar is handy. „Technological utopianism is any ideology based on the premise that advances in science and technology could and should bring about a utopia, or at least help to fulfil one or another utopian ideal. A tech-utopia does not disregard any problems that technology may cause but strongly believes that technology allows mankind to make social, economic, political, and cultural advancements. Overall, Technological Utopianism views technology’s impacts as extremely positive.” (Wikipedia) My concept of a technological utopia world in which technology can address many difficulties and everything appears to be so simple may be a good ideology to relate to menstrual apps, where you can solve any women’s health-related issue with data. I don’t want to argue in my paper about whether we live in technological utopia or not but rather how do people create apps in a sense of it. Research Question: How do menstrual apps comfort and secure women, and how can it be reflected by the technological utopian approach to women’s health? Research Problem: In my paper, I’d like to concentrate on the menstrual app Flo. I feel like in our times’ people like to become more independent about their health(from going all the time to the clinic/doctor). I’d like to write about the app’s features, how it operates, and how it affects women of all ages. Cycle monitoring applications save and analyze data such as your previous periods, sleep patterns, heart rate, basal body temperature, and cervical fluid. You enter the information into the app, which uses it to predict when you’ll have your period and when you’ll ovulate. Women are becoming more aware of their bodies and health, so having an app that calculates everything for you rather than a self-guided calendar is quite handy. My concept of a technological utopia world in which technology can address many difficulties and everything appears to be so simple may be a good ideology to relate to menstrual apps, where you can solve any women’s health-related issue with data. Main Argument: Living in a technological utopia where menstrual apps can solve any women’s health problem, based on gathered data from many active users. Theoretical Framework: „Technological utopianism is any ideology based on the premise that advances in science and technology could and should bring about a utopia, or at least help to fulfil one or another utopian ideal. A tech-utopia does not disregard any problems that technology may cause but strongly believes that technology allows mankind to make social, economic, political, and cultural advancements. Overall, Technological Utopianism views technology’s impacts as extremely positive.” (Wikipedia) As previously stated, Techno-utopia sees the impact of technology as super beneficial which I will use in the context of menstrual/cycle tracking apps. The users may solve the problems just by an app. With these articles: Dickel, Sascha, and Jan-Felix Schrape. 2017. “The Logic of Digital Utopianism.” NanoEthics 11 (1): 47–58. https://doi.org/10.1007/s11569-017-0285-6. Lupton, Deborah. 2014. “Beyond Techno-Utopia: Critical Approaches to Digital Health Technologies.” Societies 4 (4): 706–11. https://doi.org/10.3390/soc4040706. I would like to investigate more about technological utopia, how it works and how you can see it in our world. Grieger, Jessica A., and Robert J. Norman. 2020. “Menstrual Cycle Length and Patterns in a Global Cohort of Women Using a Mobile Phone App: Retrospective Cohort Study.” Journal of Medical Internet Research 22 (6): e17109. https://doi.org/ 10.2196/17109. Lupton, Deborah. 2016. “The Use and Value of Digital Media for Information about Pregnancy and Early Motherhood: A Focus Group Study.” BMC Pregnancy and Childbirth 16 (1): 171. https://doi.org/10.1186/s12884-016-0971-3. From these texts, I want to learn more about an actual study of the menstrual cycle, pregnancy and post-pregnancy to get more into medical concepts and also how it is used in the apps. Rodriguez, Erika Marie, Daniel Thomas, Anna Druet, Marija Vlajic-Wheeler, Kevin James Lane, and Shruthi Mahalingaiah. 2020. “Identifying Women at Risk for Polycystic Ovary Syndrome Using a Mobile Health App: Virtual Tool Functionality Assessment.” JMIR Formative Research 4 (5): e15094. https://doi.org/ 10.2196/15094. I would like to get more into how apps can warn you about the risk of a disease, just like here PCOS. Methodology: I have chosen the app Flo as my object of study. I want to focus on the features of this app. Starting with the pastel colourations which make women calm and safe. Visible calendar with marked days of ovulation and menstruation which is convenient to read. Users can add all their activities of the day also signs/symptoms such as cramps or a headache. There are interesting articles about many women’s issues from intercourses problems to conditions such as PCOS. Also as you open the app the chat pops up where you can ask your private questions and as the result, you will be despatched to an article about it or a specialist. I consider this app as a suitable object of study for this paper, due to the fact of its features but also personally, being one of the users will make it simpler. I will use the walkthrough method to analyze this app. Bibliography: Dickel, Sascha, and Jan-Felix Schrape. 2017. “The Logic of Digital Utopianism.” NanoEthics 11 (1): 47–58. https://doi.org/10.1007/s11569-017-0285-6. Lupton, Deborah. 2016. “The Use and Value of Digital Media for Information about Pregnancy and Early Motherhood: A Focus Group Study.” BMC Pregnancy and Childbirth 16 (1): 171. https:// doi.org/10.1186/s12884-016-0971-3. Lupton, Deborah. 2014. “Beyond Techno-Utopia: Critical Approaches to Digital Health Technologies.” Societies 4 (4): 706–11. https://doi.org/10.3390/soc4040706. Grieger, Jessica A., and Robert J. Norman. 2020. “Menstrual Cycle Length and Patterns in a Global Cohort of Women Using a Mobile Phone App: Retrospective Cohort Study.” Journal of Medical Internet Research 22 (6): e17109. https://doi.org/10.2196/17109. Rodriguez, Erika Marie, Daniel Thomas, Anna Druet, Marija Vlajic-Wheeler, Kevin James Lane, and Shruthi Mahalingaiah. 2020. “Identifying Women at Risk for Polycystic Ovary Syndrome Using a Mobile Health App: Virtual Tool Functionality Assessment.” JMIR Formative Research 4 (5): e15094. https://doi.org/10.2196/15094. Rich, Emma, and Andy Miah. 2014. “Understanding Digital Health as Public Pedagogy: A Critical Framework.” Societies 4 (2): 296–315. https://doi.org/10.3390/soc4020296. AppGrooves. 2020. How To Use Flo App To Track Your Period And Feminine Health? https:// www.youtube.com/watch?v=euLb4rum_Fk.